Dressage

Dressage is the training of a horse (or, in this case, a ponyboy or ponygirl) to perform specialized, choreographed moves. The word “dressage” is derived from the French word for “training.” The purpose of dressage is to achieve precision and beauty through training. In Second Life, there are two types of pony dressage: Silent Dressage and Flower Dressage. Each of them will be discussed in detail here.

I. Silent Dressage

The purpose of silent dressage is to complete various tasks according to commands given by the trainer. The event is called “silent” because the pony must complete the event based solely on the position of the trainer and the direction in which the trainer is facing. The trainer and pony are not permitted to communicate with each other; the pony needs to complete the events based entirely on where the trainer is located and the direction the trainer is facing.

A. How to Start

First, the trainer should obtain a pattern. The trainer can either develop his/her own pattern, or can obtain a pattern by clicking the “pattern giver” located next the dressage field. (The pattern giver is the blue box next to the field.) The trainer should not communicate the pattern to the pony.

When they are ready to start, the pony and trainer should stand outside the dressage field together, next to the letter A. The pony stands on the left of the A, and the trainer stands on the right of the A, as indicated in the picture below:

This is the silent dressage field. The T and P indicate the starting positions of the Trainer and Pony.

To begin, the pony and trainer cross the field border and enter the field, stopping upon entering the field. The pony and trainer then bow to the judges. (The judges are always seated on the opposite side of the field, on the outside of the slalom poles.) (Tip: The trainer and pony should ideally enter the field and bow to the judges at precisely the same time, so their movements are synchronized. Good synchronization takes practice.)

B. How to Move Around the Field

This is where things get a little tricky. Moving around on the field depends on which style of dressage one is performing. There are four basic styles, each with their own protocols and rules:

1. Traditional Style

In the traditional style, the trainer signals the pony to move between events, and to start events, by using a signal (typically, a whip strike). The pony moves between events upon a whip stroke, and starts an event based upon a whip stroke. The sequence works like this:

  1. The trainer moves into position, while the pony remains still.
  2. Once in position, the trainer strikes the whip.
  3. Upon hearing the whip stroke, the pony moves into position.
  4. The trainer strikes the whip.
  5. Upon hearing the whip stroke, the pony performs the event.
  6. (Repeat)

In the traditional style, the pony moves between events without crossing over another event. (For example, moving from the Figure 8 to Line C, the pony avoids the figure 8 by walking in an arching curve from the Figure 8 to the letter C.)

2. Modern Style

The modern style is intended to make dressage both more efficient and truly silent. In the modern style, the trainer is permitted to move around the field without waiting for the pony to finish the prior event. Also, the pony transitions between events, and starts events, without any type of signal from the trainer. The sequence works like this:

  1. The trainer moves into position.
  2. Once the trainer is in position, the pony moves into position.
  3. When the pony is ready, the pony commences the event (without waiting for any signal).
  4. The trainer moves to the next position. (The trainer may optionally do this without waiting for the pony to finish the last event.)
  5. (Repeat)

In the modern style, the pony may move between events with disregard of other events, even if this means walking over the other events. (For example, in moving from Figure 8 to Line C, the pony is permitted to move in a straight line across the Figure 8.)

3. Traverse

Traverse is the most formal style. In traverse, the trainer moves around the field in the same way as the other styles. However, the way the pony moves about the field is vastly different. The rules are as follows:

  1. To move from the starting position to the first event, the pony must walk clockwise around the outside edge of the field (staying within the field). Exception: If the first event is the Figure 8, the pony may move directly to the Figure 8.
  2. After the first event has been performed, the pony must transition between events by walking to the outside edge of the field, and then along that edge (staying within the field) on the shortest path to the next event. In doing so, the pony may move either clockwise or counterclockwise along the outside edge. Exception: If the transition between events is on a straight line, the pony is required to move along that line. These straight transitions are as follows:

    Figure 8 to Circle C
    Line C to Circle C
    Line D to Circle D
    Circle C to Line C
    Circle D to Line D
    Line H to Circle C
    Circle C to Line H
    Line G to Circle D
    Circle D to Line G

  3. The pony may not ever turn completely around (i.e., no 180-degree turns) before or after any event. Exception: The pony may exit the Figure 8 by performing a 180-degree turn.

4. Leashed Dressage

Leashed dressage is precisely what it sounds like: The pony is at all times on a leash held by the trainer. Leashed dressage can be beautiful and elegant when the trainer and pony are synchronized. Leashed dressage is an advanced topic beyond the scope of this introduction.

C. How to do the Figure 8

There are two flavors of the figure 8: B and I. In the B flavor, the trainer walks to the inside of the figure 8 closest to J, and then stands facing the letter B. The pony then walks to the center of the figure 8 and stands on the center dot. The pony then walks along the dotted line of the figure 8, turning toward the letter B to start, as illustrated below. The pony completes the figure 8 pattern three times, focusing on elegance and precision.

Figure 8 B. The trainer T faces toward the letter B as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P then walks the Figure 8 three times, starting by turning away from the trainer and toward the letter B as indicated by the red arrow. The pony starts and stops precisely on the dot in the center of the Figure 8.

In the letter I flavor of this pattern, the trainer walks to the inside of the figure 8 closest to B, and then stands facing the letter I. The pony then walks to the center of the figure 8 and stands on the center dot. The pony then walks around the dotted line of the figure 8, turning toward the letter I to start, as illustrated below. The pony completes the pattern three times, focusing on elegance and precision.

Figure 8 I. The trainer T faces toward the letter I as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P then walks the Figure 8 three times, starting by turning away from the trainer and toward the letter I as indicated by the red arrow. The pony starts and stops precisely on the dot in the center of the Figure 8.

D. How to do Line H and Line C

Line H and Line C are similar tasks on opposite sides of the field; they work the same way. For Line H, the trainer stands near the dot closest H. (Tip: The trainer should stand near the dot, but not blocking the pony’s path to the dot. It is inelegant for the pony to be required to walk around the trainer to reach the dot.) The pony then stands on the dot. The pony then walks from the dot in a straight line, stopping to the dot closest to G.

Line C. The trainer T faces toward the letter C. The pony P walks in a straight line, starting and stopping on the dots at C and D, respectively.

Line C is the same maneuver. The trainer stands near the dot closest to C. The pony then stands on the dot. the pony then walks from the dot in a straight line, stopping on the dot closest to D.

Line H. The trainer T faces toward the letter H. The pony P walks in a straight line, starting and stopping on the dots at H and D, respectively.

Line H and Line C are deceptively difficult. At first glance, they are simple tasks that involve simply walking in a straight line. However, it can be quite difficult to consistently start and stop in the exact center of the dots at the start and end of the line; try it.

E. How to do Line D and Line G

Line D and Line G both involve walking backward. They are similar tasks on opposite sides of the field. Before the pony attempts this task, the pony should be sure that this feature is enabled in his or her viewer. In Firestorm, this is done in the Preferences menu under Preferences -> Move & View -> Movement. Be sure that “Allow avatars to walk backwards on your screen” is checked as illustrated below:

In the middle of this preferences window, be sure to check “Allow avatars to walk backwards on your screen”

To accomplish Line D, the trainer stands near the dot closest to D. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then walks backward, stopping on the dot closest to C.

Line D. The trainer T stands facing the letter D. The pony P walks backwards in a straight line, starting and stopping on the dots closest to D and C, respectively.

To walk backwards: press and hold the up/down arrows at the same time (or, alternatively, the W and S keys, if AWSD movement is enabled). Then, let go of the up arrow (or the W key) while continuing to press down on the down arrow (or the S key); you will walk backwarrds!

To accomplish Line G, the trainer stands near the dot closest to G. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then walks backward, stopping on the dot closest to H.

Line G. The trainer T stands facing the letter G. The pony P walks backwards in a straight line, starting and stopping on the dots closest to G and H, respectively.

F. How to do Circle H, C, D and G

The inner circle comes in four flavors: H, C, D and G. All of them are similar. To accomplish Circle H, the trainer stands near the circle facing the letter H. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then completes the circle three times, turning first toward the letter H.

Circle H. The trainer T stands in the circle facing the letter H as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P walks the circle three times, starting by turning away from the trainer toward the letter H as indicated by the red arrow.

To accomplish Circle C, the trainer stands near the circle facing the letter C. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then completes the circle three times, turning first toward the letter C.

Circle C. The trainer T stands in the circle facing the letter C as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P walks the circle three times, starting by turning away from the trainer toward the letter C as indicated by the red arrow.

To accomplish Circle D, the trainer stands near the circle facing the letter D. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then completes the circle three times, turning first toward the letter D.

Circle D. The trainer T stands in the circle facing the letter D as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P walks the circle three times, starting by turning away from the trainer toward the letter D as indicated by the red arrow.

To accomplish Circle G, the trainer stands near the circle facing the letter G. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then completes the circle three times, turning forward toward the letter G.

Circle G. The trainer T stands in the circle facing the letter G as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P walks the circle three times, starting by turning away from the trainer toward the letter G as indicated by the red arrow.

G. How to do Slalom F and E

Slalom F and E are similar tasks in opposite directions. To accomplish Slalom F, the trainer stands near the dot closest to F. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then walks through the slalom poles, weaving between the poles, stopping at the dot closest to letter E. (Tip: The focus here is elegance, not speed. The pony should walk through the poles evenly and cleanly, leaving an ample, uniform space between the pony and each pole.)

Slalom F. The trainer T stands facing the letter F as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P walks the slalom, weaving between the poles, starting and stopping precisely on the dots closest to letters F and E, respectively, as indicated by the red arrow.

To accomplish Slalom E, the trainer stands near the dot closest to E. The pony then stands on that dot. The pony then walks through the slalom poles, weaving between the poles, stopping at the dot closes to the letter F.

Slalom E. The trainer T stands facing the letter E as indicated by the blue arrow. The pony P walks the slalom, weaving between the poles, starting and stopping precisely on the dots closest to letters E and F, respectively, as indicated by the red arrow.

The slalom can be performed either in a single direction (E-F or F-E), or as an “out and back” (E-F-E or F-E-F). Both options are permissible. (Again, dressage is a showy competition akin to a beauty pageant. Performing an “out and back” routine is a fun way to prance and show off for judges.)

H. How to Finish Silent Dressage

After all the events have been performed, the trainer returns to the starting position inside the field near the letter A. (I.e., the same position at which the trainer was standing immediately after entering the field.) The pony then takes up the pony’s starting position near the trainer, following the protocol of whatever movement style is being performed. (See Section B above titled “How to Move Around the Field.”)

The trainer and pony then bow/curtsy to the judges, and then bow/curtsy to each other. (Ideally, these bows/curtsies are synchronized.) The pony and trainer then exit the field.

I. Tools for Silent Dressage

To practice silent dressage, you are welcome to use the practice field at Blackwater Farm, located here: Blackwater Farm Dressage Fields.

There are also some cool tools on the SL Marketplace that you can use for practicing and training silent dressage:

  1. If you’re looking for a silent dressage field, this one from Mollys_Büdchen is reasonably priced and pretty good.
  2. The Lonely Pony Dressage Hud from [MM] uses a cool hud layout useful for practicing silent dressage, especially without a trainer.
  3. The Silent Dressage Pattern Giver from Bear’s Bits is free. There is an add-on hud, also free, that is really helpful for trainers.

J. Competition Format

Silent dressage competitions at Blackwater Farm are judged by at least one judge subjectively, who uses this Judge’s Scoring Card.

K. Competition Rules (for traverse competition)

  1. The pattern will be communicated to the trainer (but not the pony).
  2. The trainer may use a signal (e.g., a whip) to indicate to the pony when to start an event, and/or when to transition to the next event.
  3. The pony and trainer must enter together at the letter A.
  4. The pony must travel clockwise around the perimeter of the field to the first event, unless the first event is the Figure 8, in which case the pony must travel directly to the Figure 8.
  5. For all subsequent transitions, the pony must travel the perimeter of the field, on the shortest path, unless the transitions are on the following list, in which case the pony must travel on the following transitions:

    Figure 8 to Circle C
    Line C to Circle C
    Line D to Circle D
    Circle C to Line C
    Circle D to Line D
    Line H to Circle C
    Circle C to Line H
    Line G to Circle D
    Circle D to Line G

  6. The pony shall not turn around (180 degrees) before or after any event, unless the pony is exiting the Figure 8 event.
  7. The pony shall complete each event as follows:

    Figure 8: The pony will complete the pattern three times commencing travel in the direction the trainer is facing (B or I/J).
    Line C: The pony will walk from Line C to Line D.
    Line D: The pony will walk backwards from Line D to Line C.
    Line H: The pony will walk from Line H to Line G.
    Line G: The pony will walk backwards from Line G to Line H.
    Circle C/D: The pony will complete the pattern three times commencing travel in the direction the trainer is facing (C, D, G or H).
    Slalom E/F: The pony will complete the slalom pattern. The pony may complete the pattern in one direction (E-F or F-E), or may complete the pattern out and back (E-F-E or F-E-F); both are permissible.

  8. The pony and trainer must exit together at the letter A.
  9. The pony must show proper etiquette throughout the routine, including both bowing/curtsying to the judges and bowing/curtsying to its trainer.

Disclaimer: We understand and fully appreciate that the rules and descriptions for silent dressage above may differ from the rules at other farms. We respect those different opinions. (In fact, we believe that a diversity of different opinions is a good thing.) For the sake of clarity, the rules above are simply how things are done at Blackwater Farm even if things are done differently at other farms.


II. Flower Dressage

Flower dressage is called “flower” because of the circular shapes — like flower petals — on the field.

The flower dressage field is comprised of four large circles (A, C, G and E) and five small circles (B, D, F, H) and the center circle.

A. How to Start Flower Dressage

The pony stands in the center of the middle circle. The trainer will then provide a pattern to the pony. (Or, if the pony is training alone, the pony obtains the pattern.) The pony has an opportunity — about 30 seconds — to study the pattern. (Note: Beginners will require a bit more time.) When the trainer feels the pony has had enough time, the trainer asks if the pony is ready. The pony them stomps once to indicate that he/she is ready. The trainer then strikes the whip, signaling the pony to begin.

B. How to Read a Flower Dressage Pattern

The dressage pattern is a series of letters separated from each other by either a dash (-) or an x (x). For example:

F-BxG-C-B-F

The first letter in a pattern is always walked clockwise. So in this example, the pony will begin by walking from the center circle to F, and then walking around F clockwise. The dash (-) between F and B indicates that the direction remains the same; therefore, in this example, the pony will walk around B clockwise.

The x (x) between B and G in this pattern indicates that the direction changes. Therefore, the pony will walk around the next circle G counter-clockwise. The dash (-) between the next series of letters indicates that the direction remains counterclockwise for those letters. Therefore, the correct way to read this pattern is as follows:

  1. Walk clockwise around F, then B.
  2. Walk counterclockwise around G, then C, then B, then F

At the end of every pattern, the pony returns to the center circle, then bows/curtsies to the trainer if a trainer is present.

C. How to Flower, Step by Step

Let’s start with something really simple:

A

In this pattern, the pony walks clockwise around the letter A, and then return to the center circle. Easy peasy.

Pattern “A”. The pony leaves the center circle and walks clockwise around A, and then returns to the center circle, as indicated by the red arrow.

For our next pattern, we’ll add a counter-clockwise B like this:

AxB

For this pattern, the pony will first walk clockwise around A like this:

Pattern “AxB” (Part 1). The pony begins the pattern by walking clockwise around letter A as indicated by the red arrow.

Next, upon reaching reaching letter B, the pony will walk letter B counter-clockwise, and then return to the center like this:

Pattern “AxB” (Part 2). After walking around the letter A clockwise, as indicated by the red arrow, the pony walks counter-clockwise around the letter B, as indicated by the blue arrow.

You may wonder at this point why the pony doesn’t walk all the way around letter A. (Rather, the pony only walks 3/4 of the way around A.) This is because a circle is deemed completed upon the pony completing half of the circle. This is called the “halfway rule” and is explained in further detail below.

Lastly, upon finishing counter-clockwise B, the pony returns to the center circle like this:

Pattern “AxB” (Part 3). After walking around letter B counter-clockwise, as indicated by the blue arrow, the pony returns to the center circle, as indicated by the red arrow.

For our next pattern, we will add a clockwise C like this:

AxBxC

This pattern begins with the pony walking clockwise around letter A as follows:

Pattern “AxBxC” (Part 1). The pony begins the pattern by walking clockwise around the letter A as indicated by the red arrow.

Next, the pony completes the letter B counter-clockwise like this:

Pattern “AxBxC” (Part 2). After completing the letter A clockwise, as indicated by the red arrow, the pony next completes the letter B counter-clockwise, as indicated by the blue arrow.

Lastly, the pony completes the letter C clockwise like this:

Pattern “AxBxC” (Part 3). After completing the letter A clockwise, as indicated by the red arrow, and the letter B counter-clockwise, as indicated by the blue arrow, the pony completes the letter C clockwise and returns to the center circle, as indicated by the green arrow.

D. Navigating the Center Circle

The pony must never pass through the center circle; rather, the pony must walk around the center circle. The center circle is always walked clockwise, even if the current direction of travel is counter-clockwise. For example, consider this pattern:

FxB

The pony begins by walking clockwise around F like this:

Pattern “FxB” (Part 1). The pony begins by leaving the center circle and completing the letter F clockwise as indicated by the red arrow.

Next, the pony must transition from F to B. Even though the current direction of travel is counter-clockwise (as indicated by the “x” following F), the pony must nonetheless travel clockwise around the center circle like this:

Pattern “FxB” (Part 2). After completing the letter F clockwise, as indicated by the red arrow, the pony travels to letter B, traveling clockwise around the center circle, as indicated by the blue arrow. The center circle is always traveled clockwise, regardless of the current direction of travel.

Notice that in the figure above, the pony travels clockwise around the center circle, even though the current direction of travel is counter-clockwise. This is true because the center circle must always be traveled clockwise, regardless of of the current direction of travel. Lastly, the pony completes the pattern by traveling counter-clockwise around letter B like this:

Pattern “FxB” (Part 3). The pony completes the pattern by walking counter-clockwise around letter B and then returning to the center circle, as indicated by the green arrow.

The exception to this rule is when the pony does not walk around the center circle but only touches a single point on the circle. Under these circumstances, the pony is required to take the shortest path of travel. (For this reason, this exception is sometimes called the “shortest path rule.”) For example, consider the following pattern:

B-H

In this pattern, the pony begins by leaving the center circle and walking around letter B clockwise like this:

Pattern “B-H” (Part 1). The pony begins by leaving the center circle and walking clockwise around letter B as indicated by the red arrow.

Next, the pony must navigate to H via the center circle. Because the pony touches the center circle at only a single point, the center circle is not traveled clockwise; rather, the pony is required to take the shortest path to letter H like this:

Pattern “B-H” (Part 2). After walking the letter B clockwise, as indicated by the red arrow, the pony travels to H via the center circle. The pony is not required to travel clockwise around the center circle because the pony intersects the center circle at only a single point.

Lastly, the pony completes the pattern by walking clockwise around letter H and then returning to the center circle like this:

Pattern “B-H” (Part 3). The pony completes the pattern by walking clockwise around the letter H and then returning to the center circle as indicated by the green arrow.

D. The Halfway Rule

The pony must complete at least half of any circle in order to move to the next circle. For example, consider this pattern:

BxAxH

The pony begins by walking clockwise around B, and then counter-clockwise around A, like this:

Pattern “BxAxH” (Part 1). The pony leaves the center circle and walks clockwise around letter B, as indicated by the red arrow, and then proceeds counter-clockwise around letter A, as indicated by the blue arrow.

In the figure above, the pony reaches letter H before traveling at least halfway around letter A. Therefore, the pony has not completed letter A. If the pony at this point leaves letter A, the pony will have erred. Instead, the pony must travel all the way letter A — effectively completing it 1.25 times — as follows:

Pattern “BxAxH” (Part 2). The pony continues counter-clockwise on letter A, effectively completing it 1.25 times, as indicated by the blue arrow, and then completes letter H clockwise before returning to the center circle, as indicated by the green arrow.

E. Using the Bar

When two large circles are walked in the same direction, the pony must use the bar linking those circles. For example, look at this pattern:

AC

In this simple pattern, the pony begins by leaving the center circle and walking letter A clockwise. Then, the pony uses the bar to continue on to letter C clockwise like this:

Pattern “AC”. The pony walks letter A clockwise, as indicated by the red arrow, then uses the bar too continue on to letter C clockwise, as indicated by the blue arrow.

Note that the bar is only used when traveling two neighboring large circles in the same direction.

F. Using the Center Circle to Change Direction

There are no reverse turns, and no right angles, in flower dressage. The only movements in flower dressage are straight lines and curves. For this reason, it is sometimes necessary to use the center circle for the sole direction of reversing direction. For example, consider this pattern:

BxB

In this pattern, the pony begins by leaving the center circle and walking clockwise around B as follows:

Pattern “BxB” (Part 1). The pony begins the pattern by leaving the center circle and walking clockwise around letter B as indicated by the red arrow.

Upon completing clockwise B, the pony cannot simply turn around, because reverse turns are not permitted in flower dressage. Therefore, to reverse direction, the pony must use the center circle (which, you will recall, must be traveled clockwise regardless of the current direction of travel).

Pattern “BxB” (Part 2). Having first walked B clockwise, as indicated by the red arrow, the pony must use the center circle, clockwise, to reverse course back to letter B.

Having used the center circle to reverse direction, the pony can now travel back to B to complete the pattern:

Pattern “BxB” (Part 3). After using the center circle (clockwise) to reverse direction, as indicated by the blue arrow, the pony can now travel B counter-clockwise, as indicated by the green arrow, and thereafter return to the center circle to complete the pattern.

G. Multiple Ponies

Perhaps the coolest thing about flower dressage is that multiple ponies can walk multiple patterns at the same time. These patterns are essentially semi-inverses of each other, resulting in a beautiful choreography that closely resembles dancing. Multi-pony flower dressage is beyond the scope of this introduction. However, in the sections below, I have provided some links to some cool tools for exploring this further.

H. The “Official Rules” of Flower Dressage

The rules below are the “official” rules for flower dressage as originally laid down by BB, with some revisions of my own for the sake of readability:

  1. The pony must start and finish in the middle circle. (A single pony starts and finishes in the middle of the middle circle; multiple ponies start and finish on the outside edge of the middle circle.)
  2. The pony will receive a pattern. The pony must turn to face the correct starting letter.
  3. The pony must stomp once to indicate that he or she is ready to begin. The pony must then start upon receiving the signal from the trainer (typically a whip strike).
  4. Upon finishing, the pony must bow to the trainer. (When multiple ponies finish, they should bow to the trainer, and then to each other.)
  5. The first circle must always be walked clockwise.
  6. A dash (-) between two circles indicates that the second circle is traveled in the same direction as the first.
  7. An x (x) between two circles indicates that the second circle is traveled in the opposite direction as the first.
  8. The pony must complete at least half of a circle before moving to the next circle.
  9. In moving from one circle to a non-adjacent circle, the pony must always travel the shortest route.
  10. The pony must always travel the center circle clockwise, excepting only a single point of intersection.
  11. The pony must stay on the lines at all times and may not ever turn at a 90-degree or lesser angle.

Disclaimer: We understand and fully appreciate that the rules and descriptions for flower dressage above may differ from the rules at other farms. We respect those different opinions. (In fact, we believe that a diversity of different opinions is a good thing.) For the sake of clarity, the rules above are simply how things are done at Blackwater Farm even if things are done differently at other farms.

I. Flower Dressage Competition Format

First, for the sake of avoiding any kind of drama, the competition will be performed on the auto-validating flower field sold by Aida Beorn available here on the SL Marketplace. Second, again for the purpose of avoiding drama, the competition will use patterns randomly generated by the pattern giver sold by Pepper Nova available here on the SL Marketplace. The procedure for the tournament is as follows:

  1. The ponies will line up near the field and will take turns competing.
  2. In the First Round, each pony will be given a Level 1 pattern. Ponies who successfully complete the pattern will earn 1 point; otherwise, ponies receive no points in this round.
  3. In the Second Round, each pony will be given a Level 2 pattern. Ponies who successfully complete the pattern will earn 2 points; otherwise, ponies receive no points in this round.
  4. In the Third Round, each pony will be given a Level 3 pattern. Ponies who successfully complete the pattern will earn 3 points; otherwise, ponies receive no points in this round.
  5. Starting in the Fourth Round, and continuing until the Eighth Round, ponies can select any level pattern they want as follows:

    Level 1 = 1 point
    Level 2 = 2 points
    Level 3 = 3 points
    Level Insane = 4 points

  6. At the end of the Eighth Round, the competition is over. Ponies with the highest point totals win. Ties are permitted.
  7. Before starting a pattern, each pony will have up to 30 seconds to study a pattern before beginning the pattern.
  8. Each pony will receive a unique pattern.
  9. Running and jumping are not permitted.

J. Tools for Flower Dressage

There are a ton of helpful tools available on the SL Marketplace for flower dressage:

  1. This Flower Dressage Pattern Giver from Pepper Nova is great for generating patterns at different levels; however, it does not handle multiple ponies.
  2. This Flower Dressage Field from Mollys Büdchen is very nice if you need one for yourself.
  3. This Flower Dressage Hud from BlauDrache is really useful. It translates patterns into colors to improve readability for ponies. It also links to a Trainer Hud which sends patterns directly between the huds and automatically translates a single pattern into multi-pony inverses.
  4. This Flower Dressage Field sold by Carina Asbrink is very well-made.
  5. This Validating Flower Dressage Field from Aida Beorn is extremely useful for validating patterns and helping to know whether patterns were completed successfully.